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English
CONJUNCTIONS
December 18, 2015
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Conjunctions are the words joining either two sentences or two parts of a sentence.

 

 

TYPES OF CONJUNCTIONS

 

  1. Conjunctions of Addition

 

and, both-and, as well as, also, besides, moreover, too, not only-but also

 

 

  1. Conjunctions of Place

 

where, wherever

 

 

  1. Conjunctions of Time

 

when, whenever, as long as, no sooner than, before, till, since, after, while, as soon as

 

 

  1. Conjunctions of Cause and Reason

 

as, because, since, therefore, so

 

 

  1. Conjunctions of Purpose

 

that, lest, therefore, so that

 

 

  1. Conjunctions of Result and Consequence

 

that

 

 

  1. Conjunctions of Condition

 

if, when, unless, provided that

 

 

  1. Conjunctions of Concession and Contrast

 

though/although-yet, even though, however, but, despite, in spite of

 

 

  1. Conjunctions of Comparison

 

than, as-as, so -as to

 

 

  1. Conjunctions of Alternative and Choice

 

either – or, neither- nor

 

 

CORRELATIVE CONJUNCTIONS

 

  1. Scarcely or hardly is followed by when e.g.

 

  • Scarcely had I entered the room when I heard a shriek.

 

  • Hardly had I slept when the telephone bell rang.

 

  1. Although / Though is followed by yet e.g.

 

  • Though he worked hard yet he failed.

 

 

  1. No sooner is followed by than e.g.

 

  • No sooner did we reach there than it began to rain.

 

 

  1. Not only is followed by but also e.g.

 

  • Not only did he help her, but also dropped her home safely.

 

 

  1. Lest is negative and so should not be followed by not; it is followed by should e.g.

 

  • Work hard lest you should fail.

 

 

  1. If would or may is used in place of should, then else should be used in place of lest e.g.

 

  • Give him water, else he may die.

 

  • Leave on time, else you would miss the train.
  1. Both is complemented by and, not by as well as e. g.

 

  • Both Amit and Satish are good at Science.

 

  1. So-as is used in negative sentences, whereas As-as is used in affirmative sentences e.g.

 

  • He is not so tall as his brother.

 

  • He is as tall as his father.

 

  1. Other is followed by than e.g.

 

  • He has no other claim than his wealth.

 

 

  1. The word reason is not followed by because, but by that e.g.

 

  • The reason why he didn’t go was that his mother was ill.

 

  1. Because denotes reason while In order that denotes purpose e.g.

 

  • He went to the doctor because he was ill.

 

  • He went to Delhi in order that he might see Mr. Roy.

 

  1. Words like regard, describe, treat, mention, depict, portray are followed by as e.g.

 

  • I regard her as my sister.

 

  • He was treated as a slave.

 

  1. 13. As and since are also used to express reason e.g.

 

  • As he was not there, I spoke to his brother.

 

  • Since he did not come to the party, his gift was sent to him.

 

  1. Neither is followed by nor and both are followed by the same auxiliary verb or noun e.g.

 

  • Neither Ravi nor Vipan was seen.

 

  • Neither did I read nor

 

  1. Either is followed by or e.g.

 

  • Either you or he is to blame.

 

  1. Unless, until, if not, so that should not be followed by not e.g.

 

  • Wait here until I come

 

  • Do not go unless I return.

 

  1. If is used in conditional sense, whether is used for uncertainty e.g.

 

  • If he does not return the books, he will not be awarded the certificate.

 

  • I don’t know whether he was present.

 

  1. To express time before, use until or till and to express how long, use as long as e.g.

 

  • He continued to be lazy, until he was ten ‘years old.

 

  • Work as long as you live.

 

  1. Such is followed by as e.g.

 

  • We talked about such subjects as the weather.

 

Such is followed by that if we emphasize the degree of something by mentioning the result e.g.

 

  • The extent of the disaster was such that not a single man could survive.

 

  1. Like is followed by pronoun and as is followed by a clause e.g.

 

  • He runs like me.

 

  • He runs as I do.